The book on Quality Enhancement focuses on approaches to Quality Enhancement (QE) at universities, a process which has significant differences to the interrelated concept of Quality Assurance (QA), particularly in relation to aspirations for change. The international scholars and academic practitioners contributing to “Quality Enhancement of University Teaching and Learning” all present interesting cases on how to enhance the quality of university teaching and learning, and thereby generate a culture of quality in Higher Education.

The contributors believe that the status quo is no longer a viable option if the role of Higher Education as a fundamental part of the knowledge (and wider) economy is to be safeguarded. Believing that the primary purpose of every institution’s quality enhancement work should be the improvement of students’ learning experiences, they argue that innovative QE initiatives offer better ways of handling students’ intricate learning processes than does a focus on QA paradigms.

Quality Enhancement

HEIs need to establish quality enhancement frameworks which focus explicitly on the relationship between the activities of learning and teaching and students’ learning outcomes. All institutions need to follow approaches that seek out and value novel and effective practices and disseminate these where appropriate. Focusing on the dynamic and complex processes and relations that create their learning environments is necessary if HEIs are to move from cultures of compliance to cultures of enhancement. When successful, the outcome should be a culture where ownership of the institutional quality enhancement agenda extends down to the point of delivery.

Since successful QE initiatives must always involve jointly the student, the teacher and the institution, the three sections of the anthology address the practice of QE in relation to each of these constituencies. Examples of quality enhancement in higher education from Australia, Belgium, Denmark, England, Finland, Iceland, Portugal, Scotland, and United Arab Emirates are presented, with each section starting from contributions offering micro-level approaches and progressing to those offering macro-level perspectives.

About the Authors

Claus Nygaard is Professor and Executive Director of the Institute for Learning in Higher Education, Denmark.
Nigel Courtney is Honorary Senior Visiting Fellow at Cass Business School, City University London, UK and Visiting Fellow at the University of Technology, Sydney.
Paul Bartholomew is Director of Learning Innovation and Professional Practice at Aston University.

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About Quality Enhancement of University Teaching and Learning

The challenge addressed by the international scholars and academic practitioners contributing to Quality Enhancement of University Teaching and Learning is how best to enhance the quality of university teaching and learning, and thereby generate a culture of quality in Higher Education. The book focuses on approaches to Quality Enhancement (QE), a process which has significant differences to the interrelated concept of Quality Assurance (QA), particularly in relation to aspirations for change.

The contributors believe that the status quo is no longer a viable option if the role of Higher Education as a fundamental part of the knowledge (and wider) economy is to be safeguarded. Believing that the primary purpose of every institution’s quality enhancement work should be the improvement of students’ learning experiences, they argue that innovative QE initiatives offer better ways of handling students’ intricate learning processes than does a focus on QA paradigms.

HEIs need to establish quality enhancement frameworks which focus explicitly on the relationship between the activities of learning and teaching and students’ learning outcomes. All institutions need to follow approaches that seek out and value novel and effective practices and disseminate these where appropriate. Focusing on the dynamic and complex processes and relations that create their learning environments is necessary if HEIs are to move from ‘cultures of compliance’ to ‘cultures of enhancement’. When successful, the outcome should be a culture where ownership of the institutional quality enhancement agenda extends down to the point of delivery.

Since successful QE initiatives must always involve jointly the student, the teacher and the institution, the three sections of the anthology address the practice of QE in relation to each of these constituencies. Examples of quality enhancement in higher education from Australia, Belgium, Denmark, England, Finland, Iceland, Portugal, Scotland, and United Arab Emirates are presented, with each section starting from contributions offering micro-level approaches and progressing to those offering macro-level perspectives.

About the Editors

Claus Nygaard is Professor at The Institute for Learning in Higher Education, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Nigel Courtney is Honorary Senior Visiting Fellow at Cass Business School, City University London, UK and Visiting Fellow at the University of Technology, Sydney.

Paul Bartholomew is Director of Learning Innovation and Professional Practice at Aston University.